Open Source Stack for Raster Tiling in Custom Projections

This post is a high level look at the recent stack I built for a raster tiling set up. I am working out some kinks in my online and network delivery of cartographic products, so I thought it was time to set up a raster tiling service to access XYZ and WTMS services from my raster tile caches. I’ll be adding maps and zooms levels in the future, so check back now and again. Antarctica is on it’s way soon!

nz_from_basemap_service

Basic Demo Service using NZTM projection is here: https://xycarto.github.io/

See below for WMTS links

Raster tiling is not the only method, but it is still a viable choice for delivering nice looking maps online, serving across networks, and designing with raster data. I am particularly enamored with the quality of the visual outputs. For me, it is akin to the difference between music in vinyl and digital formats. In addition, the process is well documented and fairly straight forward. By virtue of having been around for a while, raster tiling has a wealth of information and standards to work with, delivery from S3 is a robust process, and there is nice integration with QGIS, Leaflet and Openlayers.

I break the stack in to three areas: analysis, rendering, and delivery

Analysis
QGIS: Sketching, QC, and general geospatial work.

GDAL: Processing raster data. Configuring your rasters in an optimal format from the beginning will greatly improve your rendering speeds. I recommend creating a good set of overviews and gathering everything into a virtual raster tile (VRT).

Postgres/PostGIS: Handling your vector data. Pulling all your data from a database significantly improves rendering speeds. Don’t forget to index!

Rendering
Tilemill/Mapnik XML: Yes, I still design using CartoCSS when working with raster data. I love the simplicity of the language. Tilemill is easy enough to containerize these days too. Tilemill exports into the Mapnik XML format, essential for my process further down the line. Here is how to hack Tilemill to work in a custom projection.

Mapnik: Support for using Mapnik XML

Mapnik with Python Bindings: Necessary for using Mapnik XML documents in MapProxy

MapProxy: MapProxy is a map server and tile renderer . It is easy to build on your machine, though I recommend using a container like Docker. Specifically, I use a hack provided by PalmerJ at Github to increase rendering speeds through multi-threading.

Delivery
Amazon S3: Simple Storage Service. Amazon is pretty cheap, free in many cases, and a good place for storing your tile cache. You get an easily accessed URL for your tiles and a home for your WMTS GetCapabilities document.

WMTS: For me, the real power in a base map service is the WMTS, so, below are two links to the WTMS service for you to set up in QGIS if you’d like to have a play. Here is a quick tutorial about how to set up WMTS if you are unfamiliar.

https://s3-ap-southeast-2.amazonaws.com/basemaps.temp/nz_colour_basemap/WMTSCapabilities.nz_colour_basemap.xml
https://s3-ap-southeast-2.amazonaws.com/basemaps.temp/nz_topo_basemap/WMTSCapabilities.nz_topo_basemap.xml

XYZ: Building a web map? If your tile cache is in S3, in a TMS structure, and public you should be able to access it via simple XYZ request like so:

https://{s3-your-region-here}/{your_bucket}/{project_name}/{projection}/{z}/{x}/{y}.png

Leaflet: Leaflet will handle all the XYZ requests to the server and allow for custom projections. Have a look here for the basic HTML, CSS and JS set up.

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